Washington: More than a third of office romances end in a walk down the aisle, a new study has claimed.

According to the finding of a new study based on surveys of 7,780 U.S. full-time employees by CareerBuilder, more than 30 percent of those who had a relationship with a co-worker ended up getting married to them.

Overall, 38 per cent of workers said they dated a co-worker at least once over the course of their career, with 17 per cent having done it twice.

Despite being considered a taboo in most organizations, nearly 20 per cent of those surveyed admitted to dating their direct supervisor, while 28 per cent said they have dated someone higher up in the company's hierarchy.

The study found that social settings, including happy hours, lunches, late nights at the office and even running into each other outside of work were among the most popular catalysts for dating a colleague.

The research revealed that some industries are more prone to having dating co-workers. Hospitality, financial services, transportation, utilities, information, technology and healthcare lead the way.

While some companies have open dating policies, the survey shows 37 per cent of workers were forced to hide their co-worker relationship from their employer.

Whether you're dating someone higher up or a colleague at the same level, office romances are always tricky, according to Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder.

"First and foremost, it is important to know your company's office dating policy," Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder, said.

"Remember to stay professional and draw a boundary line between your personal life and the workplace," she added.

(Agencies)