Australia's Environment Minister on October 15 reissued an environmental permit for construction of the mine, costing an estimated $7 billion, after clearing concerns raised in an earlier legal challenge over two rare outback species that set the project back by several months.

On Monday, lawyers for the Environmental Defenders Office acting for the Australian Conservation Foundation launched a review of that approval.

"This case is about whether the minister correctly applied the law when considering the impacts of the project on the Great Barrier Reef and endangered Black-throated finch," said Sean Ryan, the principal EDO solicitor for the foundation.

Adani, which originally aimed to ship 40 million tonnes of coal a year in the mine's first phase starting in late 2017, could not be reached for immediate comment. The grounds for the review included one in relation to the Black-throated finch and three concerning climate change and the Great Barrier Reef, according to Ryan.

Adani has battled environmental opposition since work on the project started five years ago. Progress on the mine was blocked in August after a claim Adani failed to take into account the welfare of the yakka skink and ornamental snake.

While a push in India to rely more on solar and wind power and domestic sources of coal has raised questions over the viability of the project, Adani has said the majority of Carmichael production had been pre-sold, guaranteeing revenue.

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