New York: As a student at the prestigious liberal arts college Wellesley in the late 1960s, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had harboured hopes of coming to India as a Fulbright scholar but "ended up" at Yale when the programme was halted due to "geopolitical" reasons.

"When I was a senior at Wellesley, my first hope was to get a Fulbright to India," Clinton said.

She instead ended up going to Yale Law School after the "the Fulbright programme was put on pause at that time... for reasons having to do with geopolitics."

In a speech in Washington, Clinton said when she had started at Wellesley College, she had only been out of the country once "to the Canadian side of the Niagara Falls."

Clinton, who graduated from the Massachusetts-based women's liberal arts college in 1969, said she had wanted to travel to India after graduating from Wellesley. Sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the prestigious and most-sought after Fulbright Programme provides funding for US and foreign students, scholars, teachers, and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools across the world.

It is named after US Senator J William Fulbright, who founded the programme in 1946.

The Fulbright-Nehru programme has nearly tripled in size in the past three years, and the United States now conducts more faculty exchanges with India than with any other country through this programme, which has seen nearly 17,000 scholars so far.

(Agencies)