Kaneria told PTI today that he has written to the International Cricket Council chief executive David Richardson, and has sent certain documents.

"I have sent them certain documents for their attention which highlights a lot of issues in my case.

"I have asked the ICC to take positive steps to retain the integrity of cricket and its member boards by investigating the actions of the ECB, PCB and Westfield," said Kaneria.

A source said Kaneria, in his mail to Richardson, had sent some documents supporting his plea that they were many injustices done to him and he didn't get a fair hearing.

The spinner, who took 261 Test wickets, was first banned for life by the England and Wales Cricket Board for his role in spot-fixing while playing for Essex in the English county championship in 2013.

His subsequent appeals with the ECB and the commercial high court in London in 2013 and 2014 failed as he attempted to get the life ban lifted and a fresh hearing for his case.

The ECB's disciplinary commission had banned him for being a grave danger to cricket and cricketers and for his role in trying to spot fix in county matches dating back to 2009 and 2010.

"I believe as the world's governing body of the sport the ICC must be aware of the actions of these boards and have therefore brought to the attention of the ICC certain issues which require their urgent consideration," Kaneria said.

"I hope that with this consideration, cricket retains its integrity. I have sent an email to David Richardson with valid documents supporting my views," he added.

The Pakistan Cricket Board has also banned Kaneria from all cricket activities since the ECB banned him for life as per the ICC anti-corruption code.

Ironically, the ICC board is meeting in Dubai today to consider revising its anti-corruption code, which would allow banned cricketers who have been given short terms to make a comeback to domestic cricket before their ban ends.

If the revision is made Pakistan's other banned players, Muhammad Aamir, Salman Butt and Muhammad Asif, all of whom were banned for minimum five years by the ICC in early 2011 for their role in spot fixing, could be back playing domestic by early next year.

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