A bomb blast outside the security headquarters in one of Egypt's Nile Delta cities wounded 19 people, security officials said.

Clashes broke out after Morsi supporters began marching from their sit-in outside the main campus of Cairo University to a nearby mosque. The protesters blocked roads, causing massive traffic jams and angering residents.

Security officials said the fighting turned deadly after masked gunmen appeared and started shooting at the Morsi supporters with live ammunition and birdshot. The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release the information, had no word on the identity of the gunmen.

The Muslim Brotherhood, however, blamed the killings on "thugs" sponsored by the Interior Ministry, a charge the Islamist group from which Morsi hails often uses to dismiss the notion that it was at odds with other segments of the population.

The interior ministry warned that it would deal with any lawlessness "firmly and decisively" while urging "everyone of all affiliations to maintain peaceful expressions of opinion" following the latest bloodshed.

Nine people were killed early Tuesday when opponents of Morsi attacked his supporters who staged a sit-in near Cairo University, the health ministry said, raising an earlier toll figure. Four other people died late Monday, bringing the toll to 13 dead from 24 hours of clashes.
The police force, widely hated for its brutality and widespread abuses over the years, has been the target of fierce attacks in Egypt's volatile northern Sinai Peninsula.

Wednesday's bomb explosion appeared to target police in the provincial capital city of Mansoura in the delta province of Dakahliya. It raised the specter that indiscriminate attacks targeting security forces could expand beyond traditional targets in northern Sinai.

Security officials said 19 people were wounded, 13 policemen and six civilians, when the bomb outside the security directorate exploded after midnight. The city was bustling with people as is common during the Islamic month of Ramadan, when Muslims fast during the day and stay up late eating and praying.

The latest violence underlines the depth of the polarization in Egypt. The deposed president's family denounced the military in a Monday news conference, accusing it of "kidnapping" him, and European diplomats urged that he be released.

In a separate development, two rights groups, Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, urged Egyptian authorities to investigate a spate of attacks against Christians following Morsi's ouster and bring their perpetrators to account.

JPN

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