Contrary to common belief that fat is not good for body, one's body requires certain kind of fat for growth, development and glowing skin.

Saturated fat can lead to heart problems, but eating the right amount of unsaturated fats can protect the heart.

The average adult should get about 20 to 35 percent of their daily calories from fat and less than 10 percent of their daily calories from saturated fats, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

A gram of fat contains nine calories, so a daily diet comprised of 2,000 calories would even out to about 44 to 78 grams of total fat a day.

So where can you find these unsaturated fats? Look no further than the six healthy picks below:

Avocado: Half of an avocado contains nearly 15 grams of fat total, and almost 10 of those are monounsaturated (two grams are polyunsaturated). Try it in place of mayo on your next sandwich.

Almonds (And Other Nuts): Just about any nut can make for a healthy fat-filled snack, but almonds happen to be the lowest in calories. One ounce, about 23 whole almonds, contains just over 14 grams of fat, including nearly nine grams monounsaturated and about 3.5 polyunsaturated.

Salmon (and other fatty fish): Salmon may be one of the most well-known fatty fish, but tuna, mackerel and sardines also offer a heart-healthy dose of fats.

Olives (and olive oil):
Mixing 10 large olives into your next salad will add about 5 grams of fat, 3.5 of which are monounsaturated and 4 of which are polyunsaturated.

Flax (and other seeds): One tablespoon of whole flax seed which you can toss into salads, soups, smoothies, yogurt and more contains just over 4 grams of fat, including nearly 1 gram monounsaturated and almost 3 grams polyunsaturated.

Eggs: One large, whole egg has almost 5 grams of fat, including roughly 2 grams monounsaturated and about 1 polyunsaturated.

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