London: What's in a name? A lot, it seems. A new study says that having a name which is easy to pronounce could propel one up the career ladder.   

Researchers from Melbourne and New York universities have carried out the study and found that people with simple easy- to-say names are likely to fare better in careers than those with a tongue twister.
   
The study found that discriminating against a hard-to- pronounce name is not deliberate but a subconscious prejudice.
   
"Having a simple, easy-to-pronounce name is more likely to win you friends and favour in the workplace. The effect is not due merely to the length of a name or how foreign-sounding or unusual it is, but rather how easy it is to pronounce.
   
"It's important to appreciate the subtle biases that shape our choices and judgements about others. Such an appreciation may help us de-bias our thinking, leading to fairer, more objective treatment of others," the researchers were quoted by the British media as saying.
   
In fact, they came to the conclusion on the analysis of a series of tests to prove an "easy" name made people "form a more positive impression" of someone.
   
They found participants preferred names such as Smith and Gant to Colquhon and Farquharson. Subsequently, by looking through 500 law graduates from the same academic year, they also found that those with more pronounceable names were more likely to have attained a more senior position at their firms.
   
Those with first names and surnames which were easy on the ear were found to have done the best, according to the researchers.

(Agencies)