The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was established with a proposed USD 100 billion budget in order to assist developing
countries with climate-related projects.

India has been at the forefront of keeping the pressure on the developed countries to meet their commitment to provide climate finance.

India has made it clear that a robust global agreement in Paris next year is directly linked to the predictable availability of financing through the Green Climate Fund.

As the climate talks entered its second week, Javadekar said "the real issue" in Lima "is that [the Green] Climate Fund must become a reality".

He said finance would be a "main point of decision in Lima" because the current level of funding is only at USD 9.7 billion.

He said that India and other developing countries were hoping the GCF would be funded at a rate of USD 10 billion every year until 2020 to reach the USD 100 billion target.

Javadekar said that the concept of intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) to be included in the Paris 2015 agreement "is a major achievement" because it allows each country to determine their own way forward on climate action.     

In addition, the Minister said he expects "heated debates" on including more adaptation elements in the draft text as well as INDCs.

Javadekar also noted that "India will make comprehensive climate legislation" in its next budget session that "will ensure a better environment".

He said that "legislators are main force on making awareness and create pressure on the government for strong legislation and strong action plan."

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