National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, who stayed back in the US from Prime Minister Narendra Modi's delegation, was tasked to discuss with his American counterpart and other senior Obama Administration officials a strategy to be adopted to implement the Indo-US commitment.
A joint statement, issued after the talks between Modi and US President Barack Obama, said, "The leaders stressed the need for joint and concerted efforts, including the dismantling of safe havens for terrorist and criminal networks, to disrupt all financial and tactical support for networks such as Al Qaeda, Lashkar-e Taiba, Jaish-e-Mohammad, the D-Company, and the Haqqanis.
"They reiterated their call for Pakistan to bring the perpetrators of the November 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai to justice."
Doval was also entrusted to talk about US government- approved snooping on various countries including India, a top government official said.
Significantly, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj had raised the issue with his American counterpart John Kerry during his visit here on July 31, saying that snooping on India was "not acceptable".
The government official, who termed Modi's visit as "extremely successful and a game changer", also said that India's decision to grant Visa on Arrival to American citizens which was announced by Modi there was not on "strict reciprocity".
"The decision (to grant VoA) is taken for our own interest. It is to enhance tourism, inflows of visitors. This is not something we are looking for strict reciprocity. We are looking at it in pure self interest," the official said.
The official also talked about the United States' Global Entry Program available to Indian citizens which will enable their easy entry into America.

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