"Actually, Chabahar is just the tip of the iceberg of India's geostrategic ambitions. Besides building new berths and upgrades to Chabahar, what interests New Delhi more is a comprehensive scheme that can reshape India's geopolitics to the northwest and extend its influence further into the Middle East, Central Asia and the Trans-Caucasus," an article in the state-run Global Times said today.

To this end, India has recently committed USD 400 million in steel to construction of the railway connecting Chabahar and Zahedan, near Afghan border, the report said.

"Although New Delhi ostensibly highlights economic considerations, such as facilitating trade along the International North-South Transport Corridor and extracting minerals, natural gas and oil from the region, its larger geo-strategic calculations and ambitions are obvious," it said.

"A direct gateway through Pakistan provides the shortest and the most economical access for India to enter Afghanistan and Central Asia," it said.

However, due to long-standing mistrust, Islamabad is reluctant to grant India access. "The sea-land route of Chabahar Port is designed to bypass Pakistan. With the new route, some Indian strategists suggest that India can take further advantage of its ties with Iran and Afghanistan and gain new leverage and positioning while reducing Pakistan's political and economic influence in the region," the report said.

"Besides bypassing the overland blockage, India also views its investment in Chabahar as a counterweight against Pakistan's Gwadar Port, a Chinese-funded deep sea port 72 kms east of Chabahar," it said.

China and Pakistan are currently building a USD 46 billion economic corridor linking Pakistan's Gwadar port with Xinjiang to improve connectivity between the two countries.

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