The recommendation by the 9-member panel was, however, not unanimous, with one full-time member and two government representatives dissenting and supporting retention of capital punishment.

In its last report, the 20th Law Commission said there is a need to debate as to how to bring about the 'abolition of death penalty in all respects in the very near future, soonest'. The panel, while refusing to recommend any single model for abolishing death penalty, said 'the options are many – from moratorium to a full-fledged abolition bill. The Law Commission does not wish to commit to a particular approach in abolition.

All it says is that such a method for abolition should be compatible with the fundamental value of achieving swift and irreversible, absolute abolition. While supporting death for those convicted in terror cases and for waging war against the country, the report, 'The death Penalty' said that although there is no valid penological justification for treating terrorism differently from other crimes, concern is often raised that abolition of capital punishment for terror-related offences and waging war will affect national security.

Latest News from India News Desk