New Delhi: Kota boy Bharat Sharma, a regular at fashion weeks, says there isn't enough work for male models in India and that the young faces who want to make it big in the glamour business have to deal with favouritism and compromising situations.

"Yes, compromise is the major issue which male models face and is the short cut to start and get a few assignments. But it doesn't help in the long run until you make and maintain that relationship. I never opted for the short cut and prefer working neatly," Bharat said when asked if it was true that partiality and compromise are part of the glamour business.

"Work for guys is less and nowadays everyone wants to try their luck in the (fashion) industry. Since everyone wants to try their luck, they face favouritism and compromising situations," the 27-year-old Bharat told to media in an email interview.

He started his career with the Gladrags mega model contest in 2007 and won the Mr. Pune title in the same year. Apart from this, he has been a regular at the Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week and the Lakme Fashion Week.

Another concern for male models is payment. Asked if they are sufficiently compensated for their work, Bharat said,"No, not really, but, yes, there are a few exceptions and it depends on the way you work."

Given an opportunity, would he prefer to work in India or abroad?

"Abroad... as I want to compare both the sides and zero in on which side is more beneficial. The work culture in India is quite disorganised and disappointing," Bharat said.

At the same time, he felt that the Indian fashion industry has a bright future and that menswear is evolving.

"Indian menswear has seen enormous growth since the fashion bodies started realising its value...it is no more only a trouser or a T-shirt for guys in India, it's much more now."

Bharat has walked the ramp for almost all the big names - from Rohit Bal, Tarun Tahiliani, Rajesh Pratap Singh to Manish Malhotra, Wendell Rodricks, JJ Valaya, Narendra Kumar Ahmed and Vikram Phadnis.

Asked about his favourite designer, he said, "To be true, I am not a diehard fashion fan, but, yes, the designers I always prefer working with are Hemant Trevedi, Wendell Rodricks, Narender Kumar Ahemad and JJ Valaya. Among the fresh talent, I like Sanjay Hingu's work."

For a model, both the right look and the right attitude are the success mantras, he says.

"Both are equally important for a model - the right look gives the first impression and the rest is in the attitude," he said.

Bharat said his dark skin tone didn't create any hindrance in his growth, but added: "In India it works, but nowadays Indian ad filmmakers and even the clients are showing their inclination towards white-skin models; so more Brazilians are coming to the country for work."

Born and brought up in Rajasthan, Bharat, who belongs to a middle-class business family, suggests that wannabe models give importance to education.

"Guys, get some education and brains as it is a common notion that models are dumb and they just have good looks. So we need to break that conception and create a benchmark for ourselves," said the model who did his schooling from Saint Paul's School, Kota, junior college from Symboisis, Pune, and MBA from Pune University.

He has been a part of Channel V's "Get Gorgeous" season six and says he won't mind trying his luck in Bollywood.

"Currently I am working on my acting skills and I want to get into the Hindi film industry," said the model who does 15-minutes of power yoga every morning. This apart, he does three days of endurance training, weight training on alternate days and consumes low carb and high protein food to maintain his body and looks.
(Agencies)