Here are some tips on making poetry exciting for children:

- Start with nursery rhymes: The best way to begin is to start with nursery rhymes. These will give your kids an insight into how language can be used harmoniously when spoken aloud as well as being great for your children's imaginations. Encourage your children to start saying nursery rhymes aloud with you.

- Choose poetry specifically for children: There are plenty of rhymes and verses available for children. Go for poet-writer Roald Dahl's "Revolting Rhymes". Dahl takes well-known fairy tales such as "Little Red Riding Hood" and rewrites them in a clever and humorous way that will get your children asking for more.

- Make sure it's humorous: You don't want to give your children the impression that poetry is dull and boring, so be sure to choose rhymes that will get them laughing. Spike Milligan is a great writer to try. Although his poems are written in a more traditional poetic style, they will certainly get your children laughing at his nonsensical verse. Even more traditional but also very funny is Edward Lear, famous for "The Owl and the Pussycat". You could even show your kids the style of the limerick or challenge them to write one themselves.

- Introduce them slowly: Introduce them to poetry slowly. Keep them focused for a short activity, whether for half an hour on a rainy day or for a bedtime story. Why not also try encouraging your children to play rhyming games? Ask them to come up with as many rhymes as possible for a particular word (or watch them struggle with 'silver') to introduce them to how poetry is formed. It's also important to remember to be patient. Your kids may not be hooked straightaway but if you make reading poetry a regular part of your child's routine they'll soon enjoy it. Let's get rid of this stigma that poetry is too posh and complicated - it's actually a lot of fun!