The stakes are high for Microsoft as it pushes out the new operating system for both traditional computers and mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones.

The company is hoping the new system can help it gain traction in mobile, where it lags behind Google Android and Apple iOS, and in emerging technologies for computing.

"Our vision was one platform, one store, and one experience that extends across the broadest range of devices from the smallest screens to the largest screens to no screens at all," said Microsoft executive vice president for Windows, Terry Myerson, in a blog post.

"Windows 10 begins to deliver on our vision for more personal computing. In this world experiences are mobile, moving with you seamlessly and easily across your devices. Interacting with technology is as natural as interacting with people -- using voice, pen, gestures and even gaze for the right interaction, in the right way, at the right time."

Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett said Microsoft faces a tough task in catching up with Google and Apple in the mobile space. Windows' smartphone market share is around three percent, compared to roughly 80 percent for Google's Android phone and 15 percent for the Apple iPhone.

"Microsoft will face a long road ahead to gain Windows share in mobile," he said.

 

Microsoft offers free Windows 10 update for one year