"Hubble has provided a new view of Pluto and its moons revealing a cosmic dance with a chaotic rhythm," said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, DC.

When the New Horizons spacecraft flies through the Pluto system in July, we will get a chance to see what these moons look like up close and personal, he added in a NASA statement. Comprehensive analysis of the data shows that two of Pluto's moons, Nix and Hydra, wobble unpredictably.

The moons wobble because they are embedded in a gravitational field that shifts constantly. This shift is created by the double planet system of Pluto and Charon as they whirl about each other. Pluto and Charon are called a double planet because they share a common centre of gravity located in the space between the bodies.

The astonishing results were found by Mark Showalter of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California and Doug Hamilton of the University of Maryland at College Park. They also found three of Pluto's moons are presently locked together in resonance, meaning there is a precise ratio for their orbital periods.

The findings was published in the journal Nature.



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