QUiPP, developed by researchers at King's College London, was tested in two studies of high-risk women being monitored at ante-natal clinics. The app uses an algorithm which combines the gestation of previous pregnancies and the length of the cervix with levels of foetal fibronectin to classify a woman's risk.
    
The first study focused on women deemed to be at high risk of preterm birth, usually because of a previous early pregnancy, despite not showing any symptoms.
    
The second study predicted the likelihood of early delivery in a group of women showing symptoms of early labour which often does not progress to real labour. In the first study,  researchers collected data from 1,249 women at high risk for pre-term birth attending pre-term surveillance clinics. The model was developed on the first 624 consecutive women and validated on the subsequent 625.
    
The estimated probability of delivery before 30, 34 or 37 weeks' gestation and within two or four weeks of testing for foetal fibronectin was calculated for each patient and analysed as a predictive test for the actual occurrence of each event.