The tasteless coating, called LiquiGlide, can be applied to all types of surfaces to make anything slide right out of the bottle.
    
Dave Smith, the scientist behind the novel lubricant, was initially focused on using LiquiGlide to make ketchup flow from jars like water, a website reported.
    
Applied to a surface, the LiquiGlide coating will create a non-stick buffer between, say, a plastic bottle and mayonnaise, so the normally sludgy condiment "just floats right onto the sandwich," said Smith, who claims that LiquiGlide can work with any viscous liquid, paste, or gel.

Smith has now left Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and formed a new company. The company plans to bring LiquiGlide to everything from toothpaste and syrup to beer.
    
Smith is also exploring how the technology could be applied to a new range of industries, including medical, manufacturing, and even transportation products.
    
"If we can make mayonnaise slide out of a bottle, in a very similar fashion, we can make [another material] slide through a pipeline, or a filling machine, or a mixing bucket," said Carsten Boers, LiquiGlide's president.
    
For example, LiquiGlide could one day be used to de-clog oil pipelines, he hopes. He believes the lubricant could also be used to reduce clogs in needles, tubes, stents and even catheters.

(Agencies)

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