Diabetic eye disease occurs when the normal blood vessels in the eye are replaced over time with abnormal, leaky, fragile blood vessels that leak fluid or bleed into the eye, damaging the light-sensitive retina and causing blindness.

Laser-sealing eye blood vessels can save central vision, but this often sacrifices peripheral and night vision, explained Akrit Sodhi, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

But studies have shown that although these drugs slow progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy, it does not reliably prevent it.

Looking for an explanation, the researchers tested levels of VEGF in samples of fluid from the eye taken from healthy people, people with diabetes who did not have diabetic retinopathy and people with diabetic retinopathy of varying severity.

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