"When Prime Minister Singh and President Obama get together, I am hoping that they might invite the latest Miss America, the first Indian American to have won that wonderful honour. May be they can ask her down for lunch," Karl Inderfurth, the former Assistant Secretary of State for South Asian Affairs from 1997-2001, said.

"This is further indication of the people-to-people ties. The Indian-American community is doing so much in the US now...they basically own the American spelling bee. She is the first Indian American to win the Miss America. This is a good story," said Inderfurth, who currently is the Senior Adviser and Wadhwani Chair in US-India Policy Studies of the prominent think-tank Center for Strategic and International Studies.

"I think her performance was a Bollywood fusion dance. This is good exposure for Americans," he said.

Singh would be in Washington for a day on a working visit for a meeting with Obama on September 27. The meeting would be followed by lunch.

Meanwhile, organizers of the Miss America pageant said that they have been inundated with interview requests which have never been seen before. They said that they have been flooded with so many interview requests from the Indian media outlets that they are planning a trip of Nina to India in coming months.

"We can't keep up with all the requests coming in from India," Erica Fiocco, marketing coordinator for Miss America told the local Syracus News.

"It's a job in itself. It's never been like this before. We have had more media and appearance requests than for any other Miss America ever. And this time it’s international," she said.

"There's been a lot of buzz about Nina, but I think a lot has to do with her being the first Indian American to become Miss America. We're very happy about it, but it's just hard to keep up," Fiocco said.

"They call and call and call, and she is just so booked. They all want to talk to her because she's a role model for women in India," she said.

Nina, meanwhile, continues with her media interviews in the US. On Wednesday, she will be making a visit to Fox and Friends to talk about her new role as Miss America and the journey ahead as she promotes the Miss America Organization and its Scholarship Program. She will have a one-on-one interview with Erin Burnett on Erin Burnett OutFront on the CNN.

The 2014 Miss America Competition grew by 3.0 million viewers and by 44 percent in young adults from its first half-hour to its final half-hour.

Indian Miss America resonates as symbol of change

The first Indian-American winner of the quintessential American beauty pageant had predicted that times were changing even before her victory.
   
"Miss America is evolving. And she's not going to look the same anymore," said Nina Davuluri.
   
Davuluri whirled through a Bollywood dance in a sari, showed off her nut-brown skin in a bikini and championed the kind of diversity that made her milestone seem inevitable.
   
But when America already has its fair share of Indian-American governors, CEOs, scientists, actors and other high achievers, why did her victory make such a splash among those who rarely pay attention to the contest?
   
For many Americans of Indian heritage, it showed the unique promise of America, the way the nation and its new immigrants are responding to each other and the challenges that remain as America changes in deeper ways than black and white.
   
Amardeep Singh, an English professor at Lehigh University, said Miss America is a symbol of national identity, a person who represents society as a whole. So when an Indian woman wins, "that really resonates."
   
Even though there was some racially-charged online criticism of the choice, he said overall, "America is willing to accept and celebrate her version of beauty."
   
"It's a relatively new phenomenon that Indian-American women would even think of themselves as potentially having a chance," Singh said. "It's the way things are changing in America. The Indian community is becoming more comfortable in its skin."

And Indian-Americans, especially those born here like Davuluri, are demonstrating a newfound comfort level in their country. "I always viewed myself as first and foremost American," Davuluri said after her win.
   
There have been seven black Miss Americas, starting with Vanessa Williams 30 years ago. A Hawaii-born Filipina won in 2001. But Davuluri's win drew attention "because it's so different," said Lakshmi Gandhi, editor of the Indian-American blog TheAerogram.com
   
"I grew up in the States, and I would never have thought of an Indian Miss America," she said. "That's why people are so excited, they've never seen this before."
   
Gandhi said Davuluri's choice to perform a Bollywood dance in the talent portion of the contest struck a chord with other Indians. That, and the fact that Davuluri's skin tone is a bit darker than what Indian culture often considers beautiful.
   
"I don't see a lot of darker Indians in Bollywood, in movies, so that is something I noticed," Gandhi said.     Many observed that Davuluri's skin tone would be too dark for her to win a Miss India pageant ” so it said something special about America when it chose her as an ideal beauty.

(Agencies)

Latest News from World News Desk

Miss America, Barack Obama, Manmohan Singh, Nina Davuluri, Manmohan Singh in US, Obama, Manmohan Singh meeting in US, Indian-American

Obama, Manmohan Singh lunch at White House with Miss America!

Washington: A former top American diplomat has hoped that President Barack Obama invites Nina Davuluri when he hosts Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for lunch at the White House next Friday, in recognition of the contribution of Indian-Americans to the United States.

Nina Davuluri, 24, is the first Indian-American to have been crowned with the Miss American title.

"When Prime Minister Singh and President Obama get together, I am hoping that they might invite the latest Miss America, the first Indian American to have won that wonderful honour. May be they can ask her down for lunch," Karl Inderfurth, the former Assistant Secretary of State for South Asian Affairs from 1997-2001, said.

"This is further indication of the people-to-people ties. The Indian-American community is doing so much in the US now...they basically own the American spelling bee. She is the first Indian American to win the Miss America. This is a good story," said Inderfurth, who currently is the Senior Adviser and Wadhwani Chair in US-India Policy Studies of the prominent think-tank Center for Strategic and International Studies.

"I think her performance was a Bollywood fusion dance. This is good exposure for Americans," he said.

Singh would be in Washington for a day on a working visit for a meeting with Obama on September 27. The meeting would be followed by lunch.

Meanwhile, organizers of the Miss America pageant said that they have been inundated with interview requests which have never been seen before. They said that they have been flooded with so many interview requests from the Indian media outlets that they are planning a trip of Nina to India in coming months.

"We can't keep up with all the requests coming in from India," Erica Fiocco, marketing coordinator for Miss America told the local Syracus News.

"It's a job in itself. It's never been like this before. We have had more media and appearance requests than for any other Miss America ever. And this time it’s international," she said.

"There's been a lot of buzz about Nina, but I think a lot has to do with her being the first Indian American to become Miss America. We're very happy about it, but it's just hard to keep up," Fiocco said.

"They call and call and call, and she is just so booked. They all want to talk to her because she's a role model for women in India," she said.

Nina, meanwhile, continues with her media interviews in the US. On Wednesday, she will be making a visit to Fox and Friends to talk about her new role as Miss America and the journey ahead as she promotes the Miss America Organization and its Scholarship Program. She will have a one-on-one interview with Erin Burnett on Erin Burnett OutFront on the CNN.

The 2014 Miss America Competition grew by 3.0 million viewers and by 44 percent in young adults from its first half-hour to its final half-hour.

Indian Miss America resonates as symbol of change

 

The first Indian-American winner of the quintessential American beauty pageant had predicted that times were changing even before her victory.

       

"Miss America is evolving. And she's not going to look the same anymore," said Nina Davuluri.

       

Davuluri whirled through a Bollywood dance in a sari, showed off her nut-brown skin in a bikini and championed the kind of diversity that made her milestone seem inevitable.

       

But when America already has its fair share of Indian-American governors, CEOs, scientists, actors and other high achievers, why did her victory make such a splash among those who rarely pay attention to the contest?

       

For many Americans of Indian heritage, it showed the unique promise of America, the way the nation and its new immigrants are responding to each other and the challenges that remain as America changes in deeper ways than black and white.

       

Amardeep Singh, an English professor at Lehigh University, said Miss America is a symbol of national identity, a person who represents society as a whole. So when an Indian woman wins, "that really resonates."

       

Even though there was some racially-charged online criticism of the choice, he said overall, "America is willing to accept and celebrate her version of beauty."

       

"It's a relatively new phenomenon that Indian-American women would even think of themselves as potentially having a chance," Singh said. "It's the way things are changing in America. The Indian community is becoming more comfortable in its skin."

       

And Indian-Americans, especially those born here like Davuluri, are demonstrating a newfound comfort level in their country. "I always viewed myself as first and foremost American," Davuluri said after her win.

       

There have been seven black Miss Americas, starting with Vanessa Williams 30 years ago. A Hawaii-born Filipina won in 2001. But Davuluri's win drew attention "because it's so different," said Lakshmi Gandhi, editor of the Indian-American blog TheAerogram.com

       

"I grew up in the States, and I would never have thought of an Indian Miss America," she said. "That's why people are so excited, they've never seen this before."

       

Gandhi said Davuluri's choice to perform a Bollywood dance in the talent portion of the contest struck a chord with other Indians. That, and the fact that Davuluri's skin tone is a bit darker than what Indian culture often considers beautiful.

       

"I don't see a lot of darker Indians in Bollywood, in movies, so that is something I noticed," Gandhi said.       Many observed that Davuluri's skin tone would be too dark for her to win a Miss India pageant ” so it said something special about America when it chose her as an ideal beauty.