Just hours after the six world powers clinched the historic agreement with the Islamic republic, Netanyahu lashed out at what he called a "historic mistake" on Sunday that left open Iran's ability to develop a nuclear arsenal.

But the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany, known as the P5+1, involved in the talks hailed it as a key first step that for now warded off the prospect of military escalation.

"The two leaders reaffirmed their shared goal of preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon," deputy White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters on Sunday aboard Air Force One As Obama headed to the US West Coast. "Consistent with our commitment to consult closely with our Israeli friends, the president told the Prime Minister that he wants the United States and Israel to begin consultations immediately regarding our efforts to negotiate a comprehensive solution."

Obama stressed that the P5+1 will seek to obtain a "lasting, peaceful and comprehensive solution that would resolve the international community's concerns regarding Iran's nuclear program," according to Earnest. Israel and much of the West worry that Iran's nuclear program serves as a guise for a weapons drive. Tehran denies the claim and insists it is only for civilian purposes.

Tehran has a long history of belligerent statements towards the Jewish state, notably under former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and Israel has repeatedly warned that a nuclear Iran would pose an existential threat, refusing to rule out a preventative military strike on Iran's atomic infrastructure.

Earnest said Obama and Netanyahu agreed to keep in "close contact" over the deal. “The president underscored that the United States will remain firm in our commitment to Israel, which has good reason to be skeptical about Iran's intentions," he added.


Latest News from World News Desk