Washington: With US presidential elections less than three months away, President Barack Obama has taken a seven-point lead over his Republican rival Mitt Romney, a latest opinion poll has said.
    
Romney's unfavorable rating is now up, according to a CNN /ORC International survey.
    
Most of the Americans think that Romney favours the rich and it appears that the number of people who believe that the economy will not get better if he is elected has edged up slightly.
    
At the same time, the polls also reveal that Romney's supporters are increasingly getting behind him in his campaign against Obama.
    
The latest CNN/ ORC survey said on Thursday that over 52 per cent of the registered voters said that they would re-elect Obama for another term, while 45 per cent said Romney was their favorite for the November presidential elections.
    
"Among independent voters, the poll indicates President Obama has a 53 per cent – 42 per cent lead. The President holds a nine point advantage among women voters and a smaller six point edge among men," said the CNN polling director, Keating Holland.
    
However there is some good news for Romney, the CNN said.
    
Four months after he wrapped up the race for the GOP nomination, 56 per cent of Romney voters say they strongly support him, up from 47 per cent in May. Sixty-one per cent of
Obama voters say they strongly support him, the polls said.
    
According to RealClearPolitics.Com, the average of top 10 polls shows that Obama has a three percent lead over Romney.
    
Among all these ten recent polls Obama's lead ranges from 10 percentage point to two per cent, while Romney leads in only one of these polls by one percent.
    
The CNN said while Romney's favorable rating has remained steady (47 per cent now compared to 48 per cent in July), his unfavorable rating has jumped from 42 per cent last month to 48 per cent now.
    
The president's 56 per cent-42 per cent favorable-unfavorable rating now is little changed from July, it added.

(Agencies)

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