Study participants in Puerto Rico who used insulin and lived next to roads with heavy traffic had markedly increased C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, compared to those living in lower traffic areas.

Individuals taking oral diabetes medications did not experience increases in CRP concentration."CRP concentration increased 75-200 percent over the two-year period for those 10 percent of study participants living in the highest traffic areas who were using insulin when compared to those living in lower traffic areas," said first and corresponding author Christine Rioux, research assistant professor at the Tufts University School of Medicine in the US.

"This study is important because many people who live near highways may have diabetes and other serious chronic conditions," Mkaya Mwamburi from the Tufts University School of Medicine pointed out."It is interesting to see that treatments for diabetes may interact with the risks associated with exposure to air pollution," Mwamburi said.

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