Researchers have demonstrated that by plucking 200 hairs in a specific pattern and density, they can induce up to 1,200 replacement hairs to grow in a mouse.

"It is a good example of how basic research can lead to a work with potential translational value," said Cheng-Ming Chuong, from the University of Southern California (USC).

"The work leads to potential new targets for treating alopecia, a form of hair loss," said Chuong.

The study began a couple of years ago when first author and visiting scholar Chih-Chiang Chen arrived at USC from National Yang-Ming University and Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

As a dermatologist, Chen knew that hair follicle injury affects its adjacent environment, and the Chuong lab had already established that this environment in turn can influence hair regeneration.

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