Cairo: Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore was poet of action, he practiced what he preached and lived by the principles he expressed in his works, noted Egyptian poets, literary critics, writers and academics feel.
   
Poets and scholars gathered at the Supreme Council for Culture Opera House Complex as part of the on-going celebrations of the 150th birth anniversary of the Nobel Laureate, organised by the Maulana Azad Centre for Indian Culture affiliated with the Embassy of India here.
   
Two leading experts on Tagore from India – Professor Hossainur Rahman, a cultural historian from Kolkata and Professor Anisur Rahman, a Professor of Literature from the Jamia Millia University in New Delhi participated in the seminar. Indian Ambassador to Egypt R Swaminathan also attended the event.
   
It was attended by many poets, literary critics, writers and academics including well known Egyptian poets Hassan Teleb, Helmi Salem, Farouk Shousha, Mohamed Ibrahim Abou Senna and Mohamed Abdelmottaleb, and was extensively covered by local media.
   
The two Indian experts read the works of Tagore and also shed light on his life, work and mark in Indian modern history.
   
Tagore's works as a painter were not for Indians but were appreciated by the west. He also noted that like Arab poets, Tagore was always expressive of the love of life contrary to western poets who write about the desire to end their lives, Rahman noted.
   
During the seminar, noted Egyptian poet Ahmad Shawky's work was compared with Tagore. Shawky was born a few years after Tagore and often placed by critics in the same category with him as they were both born under the British occupation of their countries, resisted it and both were romanticists.
   
Describing Tagore as 'the conscience of the world', Farouk Shusha found new common grounds between Tagore and Shawky as both admired Tolstoy, mimicked his call for open schools and composed poems as obituaries.
   
Moderating the seminar, Director of the Beit Al Shar (House of Poetry) and a renowned poet, Ahmed Abdel Moaty Hegazy noted that Tagore was poet of action, he practiced what he preached and lived by the principles he expressed in his works.


(Agsencies)