Kolkata: Singers, elocutionists, thinkers and commoners assembled at the historic Town Hall here with poems of Rabindranath Tagore on their lips denouncing terror on Monday, as the 9/11 victims were remembered the world over.
   
"In his life Tagore had always spoken for tolerance. A character in his play Raktakarabi says: "Why there is so much blood?" He was one personality who always stood for giving space to each and everyone," eminent Bengali singer Lopamudra Mitra said.   

Observing nothing can be more apt than commemorating the 9/11 tragedy than singing Tagore songs in the bard's 150th birth anniversary year, she said "the present strife, the acts of terror in Delhi and elsewhere are borne out of unrequited desire."
   
"And this had correctly been prophesied by Tagore in his literary works," Mitra said.
   
Theatre personality Dolly Basu affirmed remembering Tagore's works on this date would make the voice of the city heard against all forms of violence.
   
Tagore's words can be more eloquent than mere statements, Basu said and lent her voice to recitation of a script comprising Tagore's works, songs against violence accompanied by dance.
   
Veteran TV personality and elocutionist Pankaj Saha said Tagore would have been immensely pained by the wanton acts of violence and terror, taking place in recent times.
   
"He was a thinker who had long back predicted the crisis of civilization. Had we followed principles instead of just deifying him, had we followed his poems and prose instead of just mouthing them in functions, things may not have come to such a pass in this world and in our country in particular these days," Saha said.
   
The participants sang "Hinsay unmatto prithvi nitto nithuro dwando...", a Tagore number decrying violence, in the Town Hall, graced by the bard on many occasions, including the heady days of anti-Bengal partition movement in 1905.
   
Anjali Burman, whose kin was one of the victims of the WTC attack 11 years back, could not hold back her tears as the walls reverberated with the timeless Tagore number.
   
A cross section of city intelligentsia graced the occasion organized by a cultural NGO.

(Agencies)