New Delhi: In a significant disclosure, the Central Government on Tuesday told the Supreme Court that the versions published in the media of the controversial conversations of corporate lobbyist Niira Radia did not match the original tapes.

READ MORE: Media can’t violate my privacy: Tata

The court was told this in a report given in a sealed cover in the course of the hearing of a petition by industrialist Ratan Tata, who contended that though his phone was not tapped his privacy was violated because his conversations with Radia were recorded.

Going through the report, the apex court bench, headed by Justice G.S. Singhvi, observed that the conversations might have been edited. The report submitted by the union home ministry said there were discrepancies in the length of the tapes and the nature of the conversations. The government also denied that the taped conversations were leaked by any of its agencies.

Tata had moved the Apex Court on November 29, 2010 seeking action against those involved in the leakage of the tapes alleging that the leakage amounts to infringement of his Fundamental Right to Life, which includes Right to Privacy under Article 21 of the Constitution.
   
He had contended that as Radia's phone was tapped for the purposes of alleged tax evasion, the tapes cannot be used for any other purpose.
   
Tata had argued that making public his conversation with Radia also violated his Right to Speech and Expression under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution.
   
The petition had also asked the Apex Court to give a direction to the government and its probe agencies to "retrieve" and "recover" the leaked tapes.
   
In wake of unearthing of the 2G spectrum allocation scam, allegedly involving a loss of Rs 1.76 lakh crore to the public exchequer, some journals had published Radia's taped conversations with politicians, journalists and industrialists.
   
Transcripts of some of these tapes had also come up on various websites, stirring a controversy over the alleged nexus between lobbyists and journalists.

Tata had moved the Apex Court on November 29, 2010 seeking action against those involved in the leakage of the tapes alleging that the leakage amounts to infringement of his Fundamental Right to Life, which includes Right to Privacy under Article 21 of the Constitution.
   
He had contended that as Radia's phone was tapped for the purposes of alleged tax evasion, the tapes cannot be used for any other purpose.
   
Tata had argued that making public his conversation with Radia also violated his Right to Speech and Expression under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution.
   
The petition had also asked the Apex Court to give a direction to the government and its probe agencies to "retrieve" and "recover" the leaked tapes.
   
In wake of unearthing of the 2G spectrum allocation scam, allegedly involving a loss of Rs 1.76 lakh crore to the public exchequer, some journals had published Radia's taped conversations with politicians, journalists and industrialists.
   
Transcripts of some of these tapes had also come up on various websites, stirring a controversy over the alleged nexus between lobbyists and journalists.

 

(Agencies)