Tendulkar, who had the honour of meeting Bradman on his 90th birthday at his Adelaide home, was later listed in an all-time XI prepared by the batting genius himself.

The Don, in fact, went on record to say that he felt he was looking at a 'mirror-image' of himself when he watched Tendulkar play.

Tendulkar, 41, also enjoyed a good run at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) during his 200 Tests and 24-year-long career, scoring three centuries in five Tests.

His unbeaten 241 not out in the 2003-04 series against the Aussies is widely regarded as one of the finest innings seen at the venue.

And, hence, Tendulkar's appearance at the annual Bradman Foundation dinner is fitting as the late Aussie great once famously said in an interview that he believed Sachin's technique, like no other modern batsman, reminded him of his own.

"Now I never saw myself play, but I feel that this fellow is playing much the same as I used to play," Bradman had said.

Waugh, too, joins the list of past honourees such as Dennis Lillee and Mark Taylor.

"There could be no more principled and deserving individuals in the game than Sachin and Steve," Bradman Foundation executive director Rina Hore was quoted as saying in 'The Age'.

"Were Sir Donald to still be alive I'm sure he would unhesitatingly applaud their recognition at the ground where his ambition to play Test cricket was first kindled."

India, who were defeated 0-4 in their last series here three years ago, will play four Tests against Australia in Brisbane, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney starting December.

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