Interpol meanwhile put six other suspects, including two former FIFA executive members, on its most wanted list. Critics of the 79-year-old Swiss official rejoiced at his thunderbolt announcement on Tuesday that he would stand down as soon as an election can be held to find a successor.

His decision sparked a global race to take over as head of the world's richest and most powerful sporting federation.

South Korean tycoon Chung Mong-Joon, Prince Ali bin al Hussein, who was beaten by Blatter in a vote last Friday, and Brazilian football legend Zico all said they could take part. Most eyes remain on Michel Platini, the UEFA president who has not given a hint of his plans.

But Platini did call off a meeting of the European confederation to discuss the FIFA crisis in Berlin on Saturday because of the "uncertain and unpredictable events" surrounding the world body.

Blatter, who has ruled FIFA for 17 years, won a fifth term in an election on Friday. but renewed criticism of his reign and new corruption revelations about FIFA forced him into a corner.

"While I have a mandate from the membership of FIFA, I do not feel that I have a mandate from the entire world of football – the fans, the players, the clubs, the people who live, breathe and love football," he told a press conference late Tuesday to explain his decision.

Latest News from Sports News Desk