“If a script is good, better films can be made. In our country, we function in a slightly different manner, though Very few say, ‘Here’s a great script, let’s make a film’,” said Hirani.

“I think success can’t be defined by ticket sales after the first weekend. To me, it can be defined by achieving what a filmmaker originally set out to make,” he added.

Hirani is not much concerned about the box office and its working but what matters for him is the content and the impact a movie leaves on its viewers.

“We don’t respect Mughal-e-Azam or Pyaasa or Sholay or Lagaan for the money they made. We remember them for the way they touched us,” he said.

The 100 crore group doesn’t lure or effects Hirani at all, he wants to make movies which people remember for their life time.

“There are films crossing Rs 100 crore today but how many of them will you be talking about five years down the line,” he said.

“A successful film is the one that you want to see even after five years,” he added.

JPN