The simple, eco-friendly and inexpensive system can produce the same current as two AA batteries - enough to operate a remote control, researchers said.

The principle underlying this system is well known: static electricity. When two insulators like paper and teflon come into contact, they gain or lose electrons. The system is made up of two small cards, where one side of each card is covered in pencil. The carbon serves as the electrode.

Teflon is then applied to the opposite side of one of the cards. When brought together, they make a sandwich: two layers of carbon on the outside, then two layers of paper, and one layer of teflon in the middle. They are then taped together in such a way that cannot touch, giving the system a configuration that makes it electrically neutral.

By pressing down with your finger on the system, the two insulators come into contact. This creates a charge differential: positive for the paper, negative for the teflon.

This could have applications in the medical field, for example. Ultra low-cost sensors made of paper for various diagnostic purposes, which would be especially practical for developing countries, are already being tested.

Latest News from Lifestyle News Desk