Flight GE235 was carrying 58 passengers and crew when it lurched nose-up between buildings, clipped an overpass and a taxi with one of its wings and then crashed upside down into a shallow river on Wednesday. Fifteen people survived.
 The black box data and voice recorders of the two-engined aircraft showed that the plane warned five times of stalling before the crash in the centre of Taipei, Aviation Safety Council officials told a news briefing.
 The right engine entered a state called "auto-feather", in which it reduced thrust to the propeller, Thomas Wang, managing director of the council, said.
The flight crew then reduced acceleration to the left engine and then attempted to restart it, but it did not gain enough thrust. He did not give a reason for the restart.
"The first engine experienced a problem 37 seconds after take-off at 1,200 feet," Wang said.
He said the pilot had announced a "flameout", which can occur when fuel supply to an engine is interrupted or when there is faulty combustion, but there had not been one.
"The flight crew stepped on the accelerator of engine 2 (righthand side)... The engine was still operating, but neither engine produced power."
He said the aircraft could fly with one engine. The plane was powered by two Pratt & Whitney PW127M engines. Pratt & Whitney is part of United Technologies.


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