Allergic reactions to press-on temporary tattoos can involve rashes and blisters while long-term effects might include scarring, skin changes and increased sensitivity to sun, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report has warned."If you had a reaction to a temporary tattoo or any cosmetic product, the FDA wants to know," said Katherine Hollinger, an epidemiologist with the FDA office of cosmetics and colours.

Beyond the wet-and-press tattoos found in bubble gum machines, there are several types of temporary tattoos that use plant-based and synthetic dyes. Some uses henna, mixed with a hair-dye ingredient p-phenylenediamine (PPD), that is not approved by the FDA for use on the skin, the agency noted.

Another dye jagua, derives from the unripened fruit of the Genipa americana, is also not recommended for use. Real tattoos too come with their own set of risks, including contaminated ink that has caused infection outbreaks, the report added.


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