The findings showed that sending text message reminders both increased receipt of the second dose of the vaccine by the end of the season as well as brought children in sooner to be vaccinated.
When educational information on the importance of the second dose of influenza vaccine was embedded into the text messages there was an even greater effect compared both with conventional text messages that only told families when and where to go as well as with written reminder only.
The randomized controlled trial was conducted during the 2012-2013 influenza season in three community-based paediatric clinics.
Children in 660 families were in need of a second dose of influenza vaccine that season took part in the intervention. Most families were Latino and publicly-insured; nearly three-quarters (71.9 percent) thought that their child was at least somewhat protected from influenza after one dose.
The children who ranged in age from 6 months through 8 years old were assigned into one of three groups 'educational' text message, 'conventional' text message, and 'written reminder-only' arms.
All families had a cellphone with text messaging capabilities. A written reminder with next dose due date was given at the time of the child's first influenza vaccination to all families.
The results showed that children in the educational text message reminder group were significantly more likely to receive a second dose of influenza vaccine (72.7 percent) than both those in the conventional text message reminder group (66.7 percent) and written reminder-only group (57.1 percent).

Nearly two-thirds (60.8 percent) of parents reported the reminder was either the main reason or part of the reason they brought their child for a second dose, and 70.1 percent said that it affected bringing their child sooner. Parents also noted they would recommend the text messages to other parents.
The research was published in the journal Pediatrics.

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