The White House called on Republicans to say they would not support Trump, currently the party's front-runner for the November 2016 election.

The prime ministers of France and the United Kingdom, Canada's foreign minister, the United Nations and Muslims in Asian countries all denounced the real-estate mogul's comments.

But Trump said his ideas were no worse than those of then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who oversaw the internment of more than 110,000 people in US government camps after Japanese forces bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 1941.

On Monday, he called for blocking Muslims, including would-be immigrants, students, tourists and other visitors, from entering the country following last week's California shooting spree by two Muslims who authorities said were radicalised.   

It was the most dramatic response by a presidential candidate following the San Bernardino, California, rampage, even as other Republicans have called for a suspension of President Barack Obama's plan to allow in 10,000 refugees from Syria.

A Trump campaign spokeswoman, asked for comment on US officials' reactions, did not address their criticism.

Read more:

>>Donald Trump calls for banning all Muslims from entering US

>>Obama disturbed at political rhetoric against Muslims: White House

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