The 33-year-old Swiss became the oldest All England Club finalist since 39-year-old Ken Rosewall in 1974 when he swept past 2013 champion Murray 7-5, 7-5, 6-4 to set up a rematch of last year's final against Novak Djokovic, a clash he lost in five sets.

Victory put Federer into his 10th Wimbledon final and 26th at all the Grand Slams where he will seek a record eighth All England Club title and 18th major. His victory over Murray was his most impressive performance in recent years and featured 20 aces, 56 winners and just 11 unforced errors.

He allowed the 28-year-old world number three, who he has now defeated in five out of six Grand Slam clashes, just one break point and that was in the opening game of the two hour seven minute match.

"It's definitely one of the best matches I've played in my career. The first set, I don't remember point by point, but it was definitely really, really solid," said Federer who is now just one win away from becoming the oldest champion at Wimbledon in the Open Era.

"Today I was clearly able to play very well from the start. The beginning was always going to be an important part of the game. "I had to save break point first, then I was able to start rolling on my serve. Played a great game to break."

Friday's win also took the seven-time champion's record at the All England Club to 79 wins against just nine defeats. It is by far his best Grand Slam tournament.

He has five titles at the US Open and a win-loss record of 72-10, four Australian Open victories from a 75-12 run and is 65-16 at the French Open where his lone title came in 2009. Federer has also now won all 10 semifinals in which he has appeared at Wimbledon.

"I don't remember quite how every semifinal felt," said Federer, who first made the last-four in 2003 where he defeated Andy Roddick before beating Mark Philippoussis in the final.

"It's huge winning the semis, giving you the opportunity to be in the finals, having only one more opponent left where you can just go all out and just bring it. "Usually you know what the situation is. You've gotten used to everything, pressure, playing well, moving.

"Everybody's tired or not, nervous or not. It's just that one more match. It's a beautiful feeling." Friday's semifinal also witnessed a 15-minute 10th game in the second set.

Murray saved five break points - the last on a 21-shot rally - and there were seven deuces. Although the British player hung on in that game, he was never quite the same as Federer quickly served up a love-game in the 11th before Murray buckled to a two-set deficit one game later.

"I said I was going to play that game with no regrets. The game was unbelievable," said Federer. "He played some unbelievable shots, great retrieving. I had my chances. I didn't get down on myself. "It's actually a perfect game, regardless if I win or I lose."

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