"ODI cricket is strong in a number of countries. We've just seen a series recently in South Africa where there were full houses and you get good crowds in India and in most parts of the world," said Richardson, who has worked at the last three tournaments in the role of ICC General Manager.

"I still think that ODI cricket is the perfect bridge between Test cricket, the long traditional form of the game, and the short, entertainment-filled T20. The 50-over game is a marvellous day's entertainment.

"With the current ODI regulations encouraging a very attacking approach, be it towards batting, bowling or captaincy, I think that this World Cup will help cement the ODI's place for the future," he added.

Richardson, who played 42 Tests and 122 ODIs as a wicket-keeper for South Africa, said he would like the tournament to be remembered "for good cricket, as major events are defined by the quality and competitiveness of cricket."

The 11th instalment of the World Cup, which will be co-hosted by Australia and New Zealand for the first time since 1992, will start on February 14.